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APA Citation: Tables, Figures, Images

Tables, Figures & Images

For more extensive information provided by APA go here: Tables & Figures

1. A table you create from your own data

  • Number all tables consecutively in Arabic numerals, put it on top of the table, e.g.: Table 1
  • Put a brief, clear title under the table number in title case; italicize it
  • Include headings for all columns, including the leftmost column
  • Include general, specific and/or probability notes below the table
  • Example:

 

Table 1
Coffee Purchases by Promotional Discount

  Coffee Type    With 15 % discount   With 10 % discount No discount
  Drip Coffee 12252 11385 10210
  Americano 9854 8571 7456
  Latte 11597 10122 8535
  Mocha 9925 8793 6958

Note. control variables included statutory holidays and equipment breakdown.

 

2. A table you copied exactly as you found it or that you adapted to suit your needs

  • Put a table number in bold on top of the table, e.g.: Table 1
  • Put a brief, clear title in title case under the table number; italicize it
  • In a note below the table indicate where the table is from and who the copyright holder is; say From if you copied the table as is; use Adapted from if you made changes to it; add a copyright statement
  • Copyright: If your assignment is going to be published in any way (for example, if you put it on an openly accessible website), you will need to get copyright permission from the copyright holder to reproduce the table, unless the item explicitly says that you can use it freely or if it is in the public domain. You would then start your note with "From..." and say "Reprinted with permission" at the end of your note
  • Include a full reference in the reference list
  • Examples:

 

Table taken from a journal article:

 

Table 2
Survey Results of Restaurant Workers

TABLE HERE

Note. From "Affect Spin and the Emotion Regulation Process at Work," by D. J. Beal, J. P. Trougakos, H. M. Weiss, and R. S. Dalal, 2013, Journal of Applied Psychology, 98, p. 598. Copyright 2013 by the American Psychological Association.

 

Table taken from a book:

 

Table 3
Title Here 

TABLE HERE

Note. Adapted from Managing Therapy-Interfering Behavior: Strategies From Dialectical Behavior Therapy (p. 172), by A. L. Chapman and M. Z. Rosenthal, 2016, American Psychological Association. Copyright 2016 by the American Psychological Association.

 

Table taken from a website:

 

Table 4
Title Here 

TABLE HERE

Note. Adapted from "Table 111-0004: Neighbourhood Income and Demographics, Summary Table, Annual" by Statistics Canada, n. d., (http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?lang=eng&retrLang=eng&id=1110004&pattern=demographics&tabMode=dataTable&srchLan=-1&p1=1&p2=-1). Copyright by Statistics Canada.

 

3. A table you create from various information you found

  • Put a table number on top of the table, e.g.: Table 1
  • Put a brief, clear title under the table number; italicize it
  • In a note below the table indicate all sources you used to create the table (author and date are sufficient)
  • Include full references for your sources in the reference list
  • Example:

 

Table 3
Dangerous Dog Facts for North America 2014

  % of total number of dogs Total attacks Deaths
Pit Bull 6% 283 12
Rottweiler 4% 158 8
Presa Canario 1% 72 3
German Shepherd 3% 28 1

Note. The percentage of total number of dogs is from Saunders (2014); and the number of total attacks and deaths are from Clifton (2014).

 

For more extensive information provided by APA go here: Tables & Figures

NOTE: ALL TYPES OF VISUAL DISPLAYS OTHER THAN TABLES ARE CONSIDERED FIGURES and you would follow the examples below. Common types of figures include:

  • line graphs, bar graphs, charts (e.g., flowcharts, pie charts)  
  • drawings, maps, plots (e.g., scatterplots)
  • photographs, infographics, and other illustrations.

For examples for using Clip art or stock images that have a Creative Commons License or require no attribution, click here

 

1. A figure or image you created yourself

  • Number all figures consecutively in Arabic numerals, put it in bold on top of the figure, e.g.: Figure 1. 
  • Put a title underneath it
  • Insert your figure or image
  • Include a note if you need to explain the content; otherwise omit it. If you include it, write Note. underneath the figure and then add additional information
  • Example: 

 

Figure 1

Street map for Mount Pleasant

FIGURE OR IMAGE HERE 

Note. This map was created with Mapline and shows the main points of congestion and options for traffic redirection

 

2. A figure you copied exactly as you found it or that you adapted to suit your needs

  • Follow the same setup as in the above example
  • In your Note give a brief description of the figure; then indicate where it is from and who the copyright holder issay From if you copied the figure as is; say Adapted from if you made changes to it
  • Include a full reference for the figure in the reference list
  • If your assignment is going to be published in any way, you will need to get copyright permission from the copyright holder to reproduce the figure.  You would then say "Reprinted with permission" at the end of your caption.
  • Examples:

 

Figure taken from a journal article:

 

Figure 2

Water Cost and Consumption

FIGURE HERE 

Note. Graph showing responses to the question whether the price of water influences consumption rates in Sydney, Australia. From "Attitudes to Conservation and Water Consumption," by B. Randolph, and P. Troy, 2008, Environmental Science & Policy, 98(5), p. 449. (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2008.03.003). Copyright 2008 by Elsevier.

 

Figure taken from a book:

 

Figure 3

NATO Member States and Ranks

FIGURE HERE 

Note. Graph showing member states and the NATO pecking order. From International Pecking Orders: The Politics and Practice of Multilateral Diplomacy (p. 234), by V. Pouliot, 2016, Cambridge University Press. Copyright 2016 by Vincent Pouliot.

 

Figure taken from a website:

 

Figure 4

Languages in Canada 

FIGURE HERE 

Note. Graph showing the most common non-official-language mother tongues as per 2011 Census. From "Visual Census – Language, Canada" by Statistics Canada, n. d., (https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/vc-rv/index.cfm?Lang=ENG&VIEW=C&CFORMAT=jpg&GEOCODE=01&TOPIC_ID=4). Copyright by Statistics Canada.

 

3. A figure you create from various information you found

  • Follow the same setup as in the above examples
  • In your Note indicate all sources you used to create the figure (author and date are sufficient)
  • Include full references in the reference list
  • Example:

 

Figure 4

Water Consumption Comparison

FIGURE HERE 

Note. Graph showing water consumption rates in several developed countries. Data for Canada is from author (date), for the United States from author (date), for Australia from author (date), for China from author (date), and for Japan from author (date).