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Design (DESN, FIND)

FIND 1220 - Design History: 19th Century Onwards

Use this guide as a starting point for researching your assignment topic. It includes access to the Library's SUMMON search which is an excellent source for locating books, ebooks, and journal articles. The Books to get you started section provides access to the library's book catalogue, and highlights some titles in our collection that you might find helpful. The Find Journal, Magazine & Newspaper Articles provides a select list of databases to use for locating articles or images. Remember, you will need to format your assignment and citations following APA Style so please refer to the Cite Your Sources section. And finally, if you need further help, please refer to the Need a Librarian's help? section at then end of the guide.

Summon Searching

Try our Summon Search and find resources across our entire library collection - books, journal articles and more!

Books to get you started...

Search the Library Catalogue for books by entering keywords that describe what you are looking for. Or try the following sample subject headings or click on the book jackets below:

Search the Library Catalogue for books by entering keywords that describe what you are looking for. Or try entering the following subject headings (or simply click on the link):

Search the Library Catalogue for books and films by entering keywords that describe what you are looking for. Or try entering the following subject headings (or simply click on the link):

Search the Library Catalogue for books by entering keywords that describe what you are looking for. Or try entering the following subject headings (or simply click on the link):

Search the Library Catalogue for books by entering keywords that describe what you are looking for. Or try entering the following subject headings (or simply click on the link):

Find Journal, Magazine & Newspaper Articles

Our Research database page offers you access to over 100 databases.

Start with the following:

 

The database only gives me a citation, or just an abstract. How do I find the full text?

The Where Can I Get This link lets you know if the full-text of the article is available:

  1. Online through another library database.
  2. In print at the Library
  3. via interlibrary loan .

Make sure to look for the Where Can I Get This on the database page!

Find out more about Interlibrary Loans!

You can access our research databases from home if you are a Kwantlen student or employee.

  • Here is the login information you will need to use to access these online resources:
    • Students:
      username = student number
      password = same password used to register for classes online
    • Employees:
      username = assigned short name that you use to login to office computer
      password = same password used to login to office computers or access HR self services
  • You must have 'Cookies' enabled on your browser. This will ensure that the system will recognize you after you enter your barcode just once despite how many databases you use during your browser session.

When conducting research it is important to distinguish between journal articles and magazine articles. Journal articles are typically referred to as "scholarly" or "refereed" while magazine articles are usually considered "popular" or "sensational". Always know which type is acceptable for your research.

 

Refereed or Scholarly Journal

Trade Publication

Popular Magazine

Format

Has serious format

Attractive in appearance

Generally glossy & attractive format

Graphics

Graphs and charts to illustrate concepts

Photos, graphics and illustrations used to enhance articles

Photos, illustrations and drawing to enhance image of publication

Sources

Cited sources with footnotes and/or bibliography

Occasionally cite sources, but not as a rule

Rarely cite sources. Original sources may be obscure

Authors

Written by scholars or researchers in the field or discipline

Written by professionals or experts in the field

Written by the staff or free-lance writers for a broad audience

Language

Uses terminology, jargon, and the language of the discipline. Reader is assumed to have similar background

Uses language appropriate for an educated readership

Uses simple language for minimal educational level. Articles are short, with little depth

Purpose

To inform, report, or make original research available to the scholarly world

Report on trends in  specific industry, business or organization; give practical advice

Designed to entertain or persuade, to sell products or services

Publishers

Generally published by a professional organization

Published by commercial enterprises for profit

Published for profit

Advertising

Contains selective advertising

Carries advertising, mostly trade related

Contains extensive advertising

Cite Your Sources

The Design Programs at KPU use APA style to document sources.

KPU APA Citation Guide

 

When writing a research paper, you must always cite any sources that you have consulted. You must acknowledge when you are using the ideas, information, arguments, phrases or any other intellectual or creative output by another person. Not to do so is referred to as plagiarism.  Plagiarism is a serious offense that carries with it severe academic consequences, but that can largely be avoided by always citing your resources.

We cite:

  • to distinguish previous from new thought
  • to give credit to the person whose ideas you used
  • to respect intellectual property
  • to help a reader locate the source(s) you used
  • to show that you have investigated your topic well
  • to avoid plagiarism

Common examples of plagiarism:

  • Copying sentences, paragraphs, data or visuals without citing their source
  • Quoting material without proper use of quotation marks (even if otherwise cited appropriately)
  • Paraphrasing or summarizing information from a source without acknowledgement;
  • Paying someone for writing the assignment
  • Listing a source in the bibliography/reference list that was not cited in the assignment

Find out more about Plagiarism

Need a Librarian's help?

For if you need more assistance, please send me an email: Denise.Dale <at> kpu.ca.

Other options for contacting a librarian, including the Ask Away Chat Reference service, are listed on the Library's  Ask A Librarian   page.